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NGC3132

NGC 3132 is a striking example of a planetary nebula. This expanding cloud of gas, surrounding a dying star, is known to amateur astronomers in the southern hemisphere as the "Eight-Burst" or the "Southern Ring" Nebula. This image was created from the raw data downloaded from the James Webb Space Telescope archive. There is over 4Gb of data in this image spread across the 4 infra-red wavebands that JWST captures on it's NIRCAM instrument. I have merged these 4 different bands into the 3 Red/Green/Blue visual light channels to create this image. The name "planetary nebula" refers only to the round shape that many of these objects show when examined through a small visual telescope. In reality, these nebulae have little or nothing to do with planets, but are instead huge shells of gas ejected by stars as they near the ends of their lifetimes. NGC 3132 is nearly half a light year in diameter, and at a distance of about 2000 light years is one of the nearer known planetary nebulae. The gases are expanding away from the central star at a speed of 9 miles per second. Image produced from raw data downloaded from MAST: the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes Original image by ESA/Hubble, alignment, integration and colour mapping by Arc Fortnight.

Image dimensions: 4896 x 4894 pixels

NGC3132

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NGC3132

NGC 3132 is a striking example of a planetary nebula. This expanding cloud of gas, surrounding a dying star, is known to amateur astronomers in the southern hemisphere as the "Eight-Burst" or the "Southern Ring" Nebula. This image was created from the raw data downloaded from the James Webb Space Telescope archive. There is over 4Gb of data in this image spread across the 4 infra-red wavebands that JWST captures on it's NIRCAM instrument. I have merged these 4 different bands into the 3 Red/Green/Blue visual light channels to create this image. The name "planetary nebula" refers only to the round shape that many of these objects show when examined through a small visual telescope. In reality, these nebulae have little or nothing to do with planets, but are instead huge shells of gas ejected by stars as they near the ends of their lifetimes. NGC 3132 is nearly half a light year in diameter, and at a distance of about 2000 light years is one of the nearer known planetary nebulae. The gases are expanding away from the central star at a speed of 9 miles per second. Image produced from raw data downloaded from MAST: the Barbara A. Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes Original image by ESA/Hubble, alignment, integration and colour mapping by Arc Fortnight.

Image dimensions: 4896 x 4894 pixels

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